Modes Of Operations

Different collection techniques are utilised in different urban structures in order to maximise efficiency. There are four modi operandi, one for the touristic quarters, one for the residential commercial quarters, and the third for the informal settlements quarters, and the last is to cover the city streets and small industrial district.

1. Touristic Quarters

There are approximately 150 resorts and hotels in the city of Hurghada, covering an area exceeding 55 km2, a majority of which occupying the forefront of the coastal strip, producing approximately half of Hurghada’s solid waste. Touristic operations classically produce large quantities of organic waste; it is estimated that of the waste produced by hotels, 60% is organic waste. Organic waste cannot be effectively compacted; its compaction simply leads to squeezing out the liquid content with little impact on volume. While the remaining 40% of inorganic waste customarily contains a high proportion of recyclables.

Due to the above mentioned profile of touristic waste, resorts are required to segregate their wet and dry waste (which is often the case). Two different trucks are responsible for collection from each resort, both collecting twice a day: an enclosed truck for the organic waste , and a 9m3 compactor , with a compaction ratio of 3:1 which is only utilised to 2:1, in order to preserve the quality of the recyclable materials, in two sectors where hotels are highly concentrated it has proven more efficient to utilise 18m3 compactors in order to optimize the collection scheme. A total of eighteen trucks operate in this quarter.



2. Structured Residential and Commercial Quarters

The residential and commercial quarters of Hurghada are diverse in nature and layout, many different settlement structures are present in Hurghada; informal settlements that lack any form of urban planning having been classified under an independent sector. The remainder of residential areas have planned road infrastructure even if not existing at this point of time, and sufficient manoeuvring space for large vehicles. This classification also includes Hurghada’s industrial zone and administrative buildings; all of which can be managed utilising the same collection techniques.


Large compactors are utilised in collection from these quarters, namely compactors with a net carrying capacity of 16m3 and 18m3; a total of sixteen compactors have been acquired, it is estimated that only nine of which will be required in the first year and a half of the project. The compactors collect waste from 770 litre containers , which have been made available throughout Hurghada. Containers are available within a maximum of 75m from every home in the city and emptied at least twice per day; compactors are all equipped with a lifting device designed to lift and empty the provided containers. A total of 900 of these containers have been placed in the streets of Hurghada. In every residential district workers on the ground insure that all waste is in the containers and that side streets are regularly swept.


At a later phase an adjusted system shall be introduced in some of the low population density districts; where 240 litre containers shall be placed at each unit and collection shall take place from door to door; the compactors are also equipped to lift these containers.


3. Informal Settlements Quarter

There are five informal districts in Hurghada that occupy more than 1.5 million square meters and host approximately 60,000 people. These districts have no urban planning or structured infrastructure. Most of the roads in this quarter are unpaved, filled with obstacles and often too narrow for vehicles to traverse. A unique collection methodology has been implemented in these districts; small tippers with a capacity of 2m3 are responsible for door to door collection, and tip the collected waste at centrally located 12m3 containers . A total of ten small tippers are to be working in these areas and fourteen large containers are utilised in the system. Trucks equip with a hook lift place an empty container and lift a full container from each of these locations every day or every other day depending on the need. Once the container is on the truck it can operate as a tipper; in order to empty at the landfill. Workers are on the ground in all these districts to prevent the build-up of any pileups and channel the waste efficiently through the system.



4. Roads

There are five informal districts in Hurghada that occupy more than 1.5 million square meters and host approximately 60,000 people. These districts have no urban planning or structured infrastructure. Most of the roads in this quarter are unpaved, filled with obstacles and often too narrow for vehicles to traverse. A unique collection methodology has been implemented in these districts; small tippers with a capacity of 2m3 are responsible for door to door collection, and tip the collected waste at centrally located 12m3 containers . A total of ten small tippers are to be working in these areas and fourteen large containers are utilised in the system. Trucks equip with a hook lift place an empty container and lift a full container from each of these locations every day or every other day depending on the need. Once the container is on the truck it can operate as a tipper; in order to empty at the landfill. Workers are on the ground in all these districts to prevent the build-up of any pileups and channel the waste efficiently through the system.



A weekly schedule has been formulated for the mechanical street sweepers to cover the major roads of the city. Roads that have little or no urbanization around them have a team of five to six workers supporting the mechanical sweepers to remove any waste from pavements and the medial strip. Main streets that are in urbanized areas have manual sweepers present on a daily basis, equipped with hand carts that carry two 120 litre containers, a broom, fork and shovel.


The equipment for this sector includes two mechanical street sweepers, two loaders, and a tipper, in addition to more than two hundred handcarts for manual street sweeping.